Life in Nunavik

Do you think life for people in Northern Quebec will change with the formation of the Nunavik Government?

If so, what do you think will be different? If not, why do you think it will stay the same?

This was a popular discussion topic and has been closed for making additional comments. Read the comments

  • January 25, 2005
  • Webmaster

Comments

I think northern residents and southern people will really see and consider this region and its people as a distinct society; however, I really wonder how this self government will affect education in the north.

  • February 3, 2005
  • Isabelle Guay

The use of the word "self"before government I believe is condecending, all people are "self" governing in their daily lives. Some more better than others. What I believe is more representative rather than "self" is to call it what it truly is, "Nunavik Government". Let us speak this government into existence. Our choice of words in this instance is so all important.

  • February 7, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

The question of how the Nunavik Gov't will affect education is on many people's mind, but the creation of this government is not intended to start from scratch. On the contrary, we are building to enhance what has already been achieved and alot has been achieved in the 25 years since the JBNQA. The expertise that has been accumulated will be working within this gov't to continue providing education services. Maybe education will be further recognized as being a key to a society's success.

  • February 7, 2005
  • Minnie Grey

I think Nunavik will change a lot, but I don't know how it will affect Nunavik. I am hoping that life will be better.

  • February 15, 2005
  • Hilda Snowball

I think a lot of things will change. When Nunavut was created, did they face problems after they became independent?

  • February 15, 2005
  • emily keelan

My name is Martha Annanack from Kangiqsualujjuaq. I would like to ask a few question; Will it have less expensive things to buy? Will it have less expensive air fare?
It was fun to travel to many places but it became a problem because the air plane tickets are very expensive now.

  • February 15, 2005
  • Martha Annanack

I think that the Nunavik Government will really help us a lot. Do you think that our lives will change? Can we trust you to bring the good changes to our lives? Are you going to make the tax price lower?
Now a days, we have a lot of Social Problems and a lot of violence. Can you help us solve these problems through Nunavik Government?

  • February 15, 2005
  • Eva Obed

Why do we need a Nunavik government?

  • February 15, 2005
  • Daisy Annahatak

I think the Nunavik government should visit communities more often because people are important. When younger people get older they will have to speak up and we will have to slove the social problems.

  • February 15, 2005
  • Thomas Hubloo

I hope Nunavik will change. For example, will it be less expensive to buy very expensive things. It would be fun to buy less expensive.

  • February 15, 2005
  • David Danny Annanack

We live in a society where there are a lot of social problems. How can we get a "Nunavik government "when we can't solve our social problems. Are some things going to changed? Also, will the benefits be changed if we get this government.

  • February 15, 2005
  • Joe Keelan

I will try and answer and make general comments of the Ulluriaq Secondary students.

Amagamating the regional institutions (KSB, KRG, NRHBSS) into one entity will be to create the Nunavik Government.

The residents of Nunavik will finally have one forum where they will collectively talk about the region's social problems, needs, aspirations, decide how Nunavimmiut want to run their affairs etc... Nunavik Government will decide what's best for Nunavik.

Cost of living in Nunavik is extremely expensive. Things will remain expensive but through the Nunavimmiut Aquvvinga, it will continue to lobby southern governments to lessen the high cost of living.

Presently the institutions (KSB, KRG, NEHBSS) seperately consult and communicate to Nunavik residents without always consulting each other on decisions, strategies, and so on.
When these organizations will be under one roof communication would certainly improve.

Why do we need Nunavik Government? Well, right now there are things that are decided by south that are not adaptable to our region. Our region is in a remote area: no road connection to south, basic municipal services (water, sewage, garbage trucks) medical evacuation only by air, majority of Nunavimmiut are Inuit, different language and culture, just to name a few.

People of Nunavik should be able to manage and decide their own affairs and be able to make rules that concern Nunavimmiut directly.

The young people in Nunavik are our future who will run the Nunavik Government. That is why it is very important to study in school as long as you can. We need educated people to take over in the future.

It will certainly take a while for the implementation and transition to take place but again, knowing that Nunavimmiut will be taking on responsibility of their own affairs, we will have accomplish one more step in the direction of becoming autonomous.

  • February 16, 2005
  • Maggie Emudluk

First of all, I wish to thank the students from Kangirsualujuaq for taking on such wonderful interest in this important process. It is very important for young people to be involved as they are the future.

We all recognize and see the social problems and violent acts that are rampant in the communities. So I pose a question back . Where does the social problem and the violence start? And how should we address them?

I believe that change in society come from good directions that leadership has to provide, but it is the individual who bring about the change by speaking out against unacceptable situations. Tolerating violence and social problems is like condoning it.

People need to realize that education is very important if we want to improve the present situation of Nunavik and that violence and social malaise cannot rule our society.

As for the high cost of living and Nunavik being an expensive place to live, all these questions are being addressed presently and I am sure a Nunavik Gov't would be preoccupied with them. The fact that there are no roads and most merchandise is shipped by air is a major contributor to these high cost.

In creating a government that will be responsible for health, education and muncipial affairs through a unified elected body, we all hope that these issues which are being addressed by individual organization in isolation from one another, will be better coordinated and provide decisions that could have a positive impact on Nunavik society.

It has been proven in other Inuit regions that have their own government, such as Greenland, a sense of ownership has helped them address their problems in their own way without depending on outsiders giving temporary bandaid solutions. It has also helped in instilling pride of their identity, through promoting of language and culture.

  • February 16, 2005
  • Minnie Grey

I hope that the villages doesn't have violence when the Nunavik Gouvernemenr take the decisions.

  • February 17, 2005
  • Amanda

To: Joe Keelan
All societies have social problems. In Nunavik we are no different. Being few in number "our" social problems seem more acute when they occur in our communities. The search for solutions to the problems are perpetual. This Nunavik government is but one of many avenues we need to employ as a means to solve our problems. Each one of us needs to do what they can to help find solutions. There will be changes. The most obvious one will be that Nunavik issues will be dealt with in one place at the U-qaq-vi-ma-rik (the Nunavik Assembly and Government).
Whereas today there are more than 1 organizations dealing with Nunavik issues. The benefit we receive today, health, housing, education, etc we hope will only improve. Each of us must do what we can to make these improvements a reality, by participating!

Acute: felt, perceived, or experienced intensely
OR seriously demanding urgent action

Perpetual: occuring continually:
indefinitely long continued

  • February 17, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: David Danny Annanack
Nunavik continues to change daily, monthly, yearly. I hope our leaders of today and of the future will find innovative ways to cut costs to the goods and services that we consume so that they may be less expensive for all.

Innovation: to make changes: do something in a new way. A new idea, method,or device: Novelty

  • February 17, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Ammack Annanack
Nunavik government is closer to all of us than we think. In order to achieve our hope we need to be involved in the search for solutions and dealing with our social problems, each doing what we can, no matter how small or big our part is.

  • February 17, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Thomas Hubloo
When the Nunavik government is up and running which I hope is in the very, very near future it definitely must visit all the Nunavik communities. Because it is very important to keep a constituency informed. The youth of today are our future leaders and representatives to our government. They will certainly need to be continually problem solving.

  • February 17, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Daisy Annahatak
Our leaders of the early 1960s felt they were up to the challenge of governing their lives. When Inuit first began to meet as a group from different communities in Nunavik, this issue of governance was one of their inspired ideas to take on.These early cooperators felt they were equal to the enterprise,(sa-pi-rit-ja-na-gu). The notion of making decisions about their daily life was so strong that it has survived for well over 30 years. So we can do no less, but to press on to acheive our Nunavik government.

  • February 17, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Eva Obed
Our lives are continually changing, for example, there was no T.V. up until the early 1980s, no long distance telephones till the 1970s, no faxes till the mid 1980s, no MTV until very recently. How to deal with the changes that are imminent all depend on the active participation of the citizens in their communities. Do we accept violence in our homes and communities? if not, it is up to us to say NO! to violence. Do we accept the abuse of children?, women?, alcohol?, drugs?. As citizens of Nunavik we are all responsible for our communities. The problems are ours to solve. It is said that there are two things in life that no one can avoid:
1. Death
2. Taxes
Taxes are here to stay, but it is up to us to make them as low as possible. How?, you may ask? It will take all of us to debate this now and into the future to look for ongoing solutions.

  • February 17, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Martha Annanack
Our distance from the suppliers for our daily needs remains the same, so in that sense the cost of goods remains pretty well the same, including air fare. For instance, the fuel used by our airlines has to be bought in bulk 1 year in advance, the supplier of this petroleum product then has to borrow money from lenders, and the money they borrow bears interest on the principal,(the amount originally borrowed). The supplier must also buy the huge tanks these enormous quantities have to be stored in. Multiply these expenses by the number of communities in Nunavik (14). It takes many millions of dollars to operate.

  • February 17, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Emily Keelan
A lot of things have changed over the past 40 years in Nunavik and Nunavut. Nunavik is coming into its own politically speaking (KRG, MAKIVIK) and economically (Coops, FCNQ, Air Inuit, First Air, etc). Nunavut is not independant, it is in the category of a Territory within Canada not quite a province. Some have described it as an "anomaly".

Anomaly: deviation from the common rule: IRREGULARITY
something different, abnormal, peculiar, or not easily classified

  • February 17, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Hilda Snowball
We should become more aware of the decisions our elected representatiives make on behalf of Nunavik citizens. All Nunavik citizens that choose to live here in this very blessed area of the province called Quebec.
I firmly believe that we ALL hope for life to be better.

  • February 17, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

I believe that life in Nunavik would improve and keep on improving as long as we strive to make it happen, with the means to do so, through this movement, in my view can only get better.
Who knows maybe will we travel to nunavik communities by car or train, connect with our neighbors by land in the near future. (I'm optimistic.)

  • March 23, 2005
  • tunutitaq

As I always believed, Nunavik will change,no doubt we will face challenges that require our skills and knowledge at the highest level. Cooperation and unity despite many difference we may express, is definitely necessary to move forward to make changes. But first as I've said before, we need to get out of debt at a personal level because we need to be financially stable anyways. Not that in itself is the answer to our problems socially, but is important to our many other quests for a better Nunavik. Vision and focus is to be kept fresh. We live in exciting and challenging times and it is time for renewal and transforming of our minds to achieve for Nunavik and it's people who have gone through so much. The call to move forward is getting louder and louder. Let's hope that we are ready and willing to make the changes that are coming.

  • April 12, 2005
  • Bobby Patsauq

Bobby,Thank you for your two recent comments. I could not agree with you more, as management of personal finances is a very important aspect of our lives. Personal debt affects all of us. Whether you have a job or not, it is not always easy to be out of debt. The power to borrow is determined by job stability and the level of income, so it seems the more you make the more personal finances are tied up in debts. It is important that we all learn to manage our money as we would a business. Managing our lives mean governing ourselves. As you said, we are in exciting times and educating ourselves is very important so that we can all become contributing citizens.

  • April 14, 2005
  • Minnie Grey

Ullakut,
I would like to express how I feel about our Inuttitut Language. It seems that Inuttitut is one of the surviving languages out of 54, I was in one of the workshops for the aboriginal language in Chisasibi and I felt proud that we are one of the surviving language speakers. One day in December I was with Saputiit Youth Association of Nunavik and Maggie Emudluk had a presenation how the AIP is standing in the 1st Phase. I was asking her is this Government going to be Inuttitut Language? I was surprised that this Gov't will be Non Ethnic Government. Is this the road to losing our language as we will be looking up to our own Government? Do not look this comment as a racial comment as I have a half inuk daughter with black background and I want her as much apeaking our language. Thank you for your time and have a good weekend.

Atsunai

Rynee Kokiapik

  • April 15, 2005
  • Rynee Kokiapik

Rynee,
I was really happy to see your comment. First let me say that as Inuit we are all concerned about protecting our language, Inuktitut.
When the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement was negotiated, the leaders at that time opted for non-ethnic institutions creating what we now know as the Kativik School Board, Kativik Regional Gov't and the Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services. In the first phase, we are amalgamating these institution into a new form of gov't which will exist with the powers of these bodies. Presently, all the Boards, councils and commissioners are Inuit although these organizations are non-ethnic. These bodies are also using Inuktitut as their working language along with the 2 official languages of Canada. In Bill 101, there exists sections that give exemptions to the Inuit of Nunavik to be able to use their mother tongue and these sections will remain.
There is also sections in the JBNQA that allow Inuktitut to be taught in our schools.
The negotiators are also working with the Avataq Cultural Institute to develop a plan to preserve and promote our culture and language within the future government.
That is why there will be Phase II negotiations where it is hoped that our new gov't will be able to negotiate new powers in different areas, one of them being the recognition of Inuktitut as one of the official languages in Nunavik.
Lets continue to support and preserve Inuktitut. Nakurmiik.

  • April 18, 2005
  • Minnie Grey

Your Coming To salluit this year?????

  • May 6, 2005
  • Markusie

Yes I do think Nunavik will change a little bit but I dont know. It might not change because it might be too hard.

  • May 6, 2005
  • Jaaka Okituk

What kind of education do i need to be a member of the future Nunavik government??

  • May 6, 2005
  • Joanasie Cameron

Would you build post-secondary institutions here in Nunavik

  • May 9, 2005
  • Lucassie Padlayat

If you were to build new organizations would the services be out of Kuujjuaq?

  • May 9, 2005
  • Lucassie Padlayat

What will be our position if Quebec seperates from Canada before Nunavik has it's own government?

  • May 9, 2005
  • Lucassie Padlayat

How will services for women change? Will there be more women shelters?

  • May 9, 2005
  • Bobbi

First of all, I want to thank the following Salluit students who took the time to visit this website:
Markusie, Jaaka, Joanasie, Lucassie and Bobbi.

The negotiators will be visiting Salluit on May 11, 2005. While in Salluit, we will be meeting the Municipal Council, going on the local radiio, and meet with the secondary student. We look forward to a constructive exchange.

The Nunavik Gov't project is something which is working towards making change in Nunavik. Changes are not always easy, but if we work hard together as a people we can make good changes. There is a lot of work to do, but we have to believe that our leaders are working very hard in order to make life in Nunavik easier.

Education is extremely important. Depending on what one wants to do within the future gov't, there are many education opportunities out there for the young people to prepare themselves a place. Who knows, you can be an elected person, a department head or an economist. There are certainly many positions and jobs that exist already in the present organizations and they can all be held by Inuit with the proper education and training. It will take a number of years, but we are seeing more and more graduates that will be able to take on these jobs.
Level of education can be to get a secondary diploma, cegep social sciences or humanities, and/or bachelor degree or masters at the university level and depending on experience.

One of the major challenges of students from Nunavik is to leave home after secondary school to go to Cegep and higher education. The question of setting up post-secondary institution in Nunavik is a good one but presently there are not enough students to accommodate such a school. I am sure that in the future, the Nunavik Gov't will be in a position to study the idea of such an institution in Nunavik. Our population will not always be small, so one day our needs will dictate that these services be available in our region.

We are not at the stage of determining where the Gov't will be placed. I am sure the leaders of the future gov't will make decisions based on what Nunavimmiut want. Maybe this can be decided through a referendum?

The issue of Quebec separation is highly political questions but it is not an issue in these negotiations.

Women are part of the whole Nunavik society. They will always have a voice and be represented. Many services such as women shelters are very important and it will be up to the Nunavik Gov't to ensure that these services be maintained and improved.

  • May 9, 2005
  • Minnie Grey

I do beleive in Nunavik to make a government and all but what if it falls appart. I hope the government people can improve the problems here in Nunavik

  • May 10, 2005
  • Jaaka Okituk

how would you change the services for women? Will you create more help for rape victims?

  • May 10, 2005
  • Simie

How Much Money Do We Have??

How will our government well get it's money???

  • May 10, 2005
  • Putulik Okituk

How many negotiator does Nunavik have? Is it possible of getting self-government? If we get self-government what changes will be disscused?

  • May 10, 2005
  • Darrell Atagotaaluk

To: Markusie
Yes Markusie, the negotiators have been to Salluit twice recently. First visit was March 30, 31 2005 by Harry Tulugak. Second visit was May 10, 11 2005 By Minnie Grey and Maggie Emudluk

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Jaaka Okituk
Change is hard for any society. Look at all the change that has happened in Nunavik!
There was no T.V., no telephones, no computers, no faxes, no drugs, no C.D.s, no walkman, no ¡pod, no Dash-8s, etc...,only 45 years ago, change is what we make of it, let us all look to make change better for everyone.

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

Joanasie Cameron: All Nunavimmiut are members of the Nunavik Government, both Inuk and non-Inuk. It would be really nice to see students go all the way and get the University degree they want to attain, the means to do it are there for those who want it through the K.S.B. Go for It!

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Lucassie Padlayat
This is for the political leadership, those whom we elect to represent us to make it a reality for the benefit of all students.

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Lucassie Padlayat
I really hope our elected leaders will look at Nunavik as a whole, and have all communities share in the benefits to come. Kuujjuak is not the only community in Nunavik.

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Lucassie Padlayat
One hopes that this will not happen, but our political leaders have made it absolutely and in no uncertain terms clear that Nunavik decides its own future.

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Bobbi
Women should be elected to poitical positions in order to have women issues debated.

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Jaaka Okituk
I strongly believe that the Nunavik government will not fall apart. We have had and continue to have good strong leaders.

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Simie
Again women must participate in all areas of their concern. All of us must show we care for victims of any crime.

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Paul Okituk
First question: Nunavik produces approximately 23 million dollars annually in all forms of taxes.
Second question: Presently the Quebec Government and the Federal Government together spend 250-300 million dollars a year in public funds for public services in Nunavik.

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

To: Darrell Atagotaaluk
There are 3 (three) Nunavik appointed negotiators. Minnie Grey, Maggie Emudluk, and Harry Tulugak. It is entirely possible to attain Nunavik Government, the only thing to limit changes will be our imagination.

  • May 16, 2005
  • Harry Tulugak

I hope that life in Nunavik won't change, only that it becomes more pleasant. Hospitality is not an empty word! (translated from a comment on French section of website)

  • January 17, 2007
  • Christian PINAULT

A bit of history here in a nutshell in the space of about 50 odd years (with igloos to the internet age in about the same time.) From tribal chiefs to village councils to municipalities, where will we go from here? From local government (govamaapik) to regional government and now Nunavik government. This is what people have been thinking and saying all this time. I think it's high time for original land owners and the governments to sign the dotted line. I think all is said and done verbally and on paper (if it is done and thanks to those who prepare and write the laws for the up and coming Nunavik government.) For a long time, people talked on the pros and cons and a lot of questions and answers on how to form our own government and to run our own affiars. There have been naysayers, government red tape and those who claim to have the right to oppose the creation of a Nunavik government (thereby slowing the process) and they each have to be dealt with properly and legally for us to take a step forward. But isn't this where we are? That is why the Quebec provincial government set up and hired the self government negotiators to pave the way for informing, negotiating and eventually, materialization. I think it's time for all parties to come to an agreement to set the wheels in motion to get Nunavik government up and running to group and govern the individual Nunavik communities. As one may see, it wasn't as easy as that. I hope this clarifies some understanding. I'm open for any advice, correction as well.

  • July 19, 2007
  • Putulik Ilisituk

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